Magrette Timepieces

Questions

& ANswers

How is MAGRETTE pronounced?

We pronounce it - mah-gret-tee

Are all MAGRETTE models Limited Editions?

Yes, all MAGRETTE Timepieces are limited to 500 pieces world wide. Each piece has its own serial number.

Do I get papers with my watch?

Yes, you get an Ownership Document with your details (full name, city and country) and the watches details (serial no. and specifications) plus Guarantee Details.

Where are the Vintage Style Roll Cases made?

They are designed and made in New Zealand. They are crafted with the finest New Zealand leather. The roll case has an extra pocket for another strap or watch.

How big is your setup/business?

Our business is restricted to a few people who all have a healthy obsession for what we create at MAGRETTE. Because of this we only produce small batches at a time. The end result being that we can focus on creating excellent value and quality time pieces for the consumer.

It's all about passion at MAGRETTE. We sincerely believe when you are able to create something you are passionate about, this controls your addiction.

What are shipping costs?

It is a flat shipping rate of $30.00 US world wide.

How to use your Automatic?

click here to view detailed information.

Infomation about Automatic Watches

What is an automatic watch?
Is that the same as a hand-wound watch?
Why do they call it "automatic?"
What is the difference between an automatic and a self-winding watch?
Is that the same thing as a "perpetual" watch, like a Rolex Oyster Perpetual?
How does an automatic watch work?
Who invented the automatic watch?
Why do we see more automatics these days?
Why are they so popular?
How much motion does an automatic need to work properly?
Is it safe to wind an automatic watch?
How long will an automatic watch keep turning off the wrist?
How often does an automatic need to be serviced?
MIYOTA 8215 and ETA 2824-2

What is an automatic watch?

An automatic is a mechanical watch whose mainspring is wound as a result of the wearer's arm motion.

Is that the same as a hand-wound watch?

No. Hand-wound is a mechanical watch that the wearer winds by turning the crown by hand.

Why do they call it "automatic?"

Because instead of the wearer having to wind the watch to generate power, the watch winds itself "automatically" when worn.

What is the difference between an automatic and a self-winding watch?

Nothing. The terms are synonymous. Self-winding means that the watch winds itself.

Is that the same thing as a "perpetual" watch, like a Rolex Oyster Perpetual?

Right. Rolex refers to its automatic watches as "perpetuals." Automatic, self-winding and perpetual all mean the same thing: the watch winds itself. (A perpetual calendar, however, is something else.)

How does an automatic watch work?

The movement of the wrist and body causes the rotor, a metal weight attached to a winding mechanism, to pivot freely on its staff in the center of the movement. The rotor rotates back and forth in a circular motion at the slightest action of the wrist. The rotor's movement winds the mainspring, a flat coiled spring that powers mechanical watches.

Who invented the automatic watch?

Harwood:

John Harwood, an English watchmaker, founded the Harwood watch company in the early 1920's. Harwood had a vision of a new, more reliable wristwatch. Recognizing that dust and dampness were decisive factors leading to most wrist watches inaccuracy and functional problems, Harwood looked to develop a watch with a winding mechanism inside the watch. This would eliminate the need for an opening in the case for the winding shaft.

A chance observation gave John Harwood a decisive idea. Children playing on a see-saw gave him the idea for his legendary "self-winding mechanism".

On 16th October 1923, John Harwood registered his invention at the Federal Office for Intellectual Property of the Swiss Confederation at Berne. He had travelled to Switzerland (watchmaking center of the globe) to locate the perfect "technical conditions" to help him realize his invention. On 1st September 1924, he was issued with patent No. 10 65 83 for this pioneering invention. At the 1926 Basle Trade Fair Harwood exhibited the world's first automatic wristwatch in serial production.

Based on his patent, the company produced watches through factories in Swizerland, London, France, and the US. For the most part, the Harwood watch was produced and marketed to the public mainly between 1929 and 1931.

Why do we see more automatics these days?

Like all mechanical watches, automatics fell out of style during the quartz watch revolution of the 1970s. Electronic watches were the rage then and were far more accurate than mechanicals. In the mid-1980s, however, as quartz watch production soared to hundreds of millions of pieces each year, some people, mostly watch collectors, began to appreciate the value of a fine mechanical watch. In the past 10 years, fine mechanical watches have staged a comeback on world markets. Automatics have rebounded as part of the mechanical counter-revolution.

Why are they so popular?

Many people appreciate the craft involved in making a mechanical automatic movement. They like the fact that this technology is hundreds of years old, involves many moving parts, yet keeps very accurate time. (Many automatics come with glass backs which enable the wearer to view the action of the rotor and other moving parts.) They appreciate the human element involved in an automatic watch, that the movement is assembled by hand. Others like the fact that automatics run on so-called "clean," natural energy--wrist power--and that there are no polluting batteries to dispose of.

How accurate are they?

Mechanical technology, by definition, is inferior to the extreme accuracy of an electronic watch. Automatics are plenty accurate for normal daily timekeeping, though. A normal automatic is accurate to within +30/-5 seconds a day, depending on the quality of the movement.

 How much motion does an automatic need to work properly?  

A person's normal arm and wrist motion will keep an automatic watch properly wound. People who are inactive--the elderly or patients confined to beds may need to wind their watch to keep it powered.

 Is it safe to wind an automatic watch?  

Sure. Winding the watch won't hurt it at all. If you haven't worn an automatic in a while, it is best to wind the stopped watch before putting it on. Ten to 15 turns of the crown is usually enough to give full power to the mainspring. Some companies recommend more: Breitling, for example, suggests turning the crown on its automatics 30 to 40 times. But be aware that the barrel in an automatic movement doesn't have a hook so that you won't feel any resistance when the mainspring is fully wound. Don't worry; you can't overwind the watch.

 How long will an automatic watch keep turning off the wrist?  

A fully wound automatic movement will keep running from 36 to 48 hours.

 How often does an automatic need to be serviced?  

We recommend the watch be checked and relubricated every three to five years. If the wearer regularly subjects a water-resistant automatic to water, the seals should be checked annually.

 

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Magrette Timepieces